A Garden for Wildlife in Wilmslow

The challenge was to design a garden for wildlife that was beautiful yet allowed space for insects and birds. 

Two key elements of the design dictate the layout of the garden. The main deck is situated in the sunniest area of the garden so the client can enjoy the sun into the late evening during the summer. The view from the doors looks out along a narrow path to a feature wall, which acts as the focal point. This path divides the garden into two main areas.

One area is more formal and includes the main dining area, situated on a slightly raised deck. There is also a rectangular lawn, somewhere for children to play. Hard landscaping has been kept to a minimum with a soft colour palette.

In contrast, the remaining areas of the garden are more informal with a small kitchen garden and wildflower meadow.

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Full Grey Leaf

The client is delighted with his new wildlife garden and has already enjoyed his first crop of vegetables grown in the raised beds.

Full Grey Leaf

The Bug Hotel

A garden designed for wildlife always needs a bug hotel. We set about creating an eneormous feature wall using decking for the main structure, almost like a book case. Within the ‘shelves’ we inserted logs left over from taking out five enormous conifers. Along with numerous blocks of wood with holes drilled in different sizes and pine cones. These holes are intended for use by solitary bees.

So we had the insect accommodation, now all we needed was their food. We gave up space that could have been lawn to become a wildflower meadow, providing nectar for the bees and other flying insects.

Although not a large garden, we managed to squeeze in a small kitchen garden. Two raised beds provide space for growing fruit and vegetables. Black metal obelisks decorate the beds and allow space for growing sweet peas.

Large planting borders complete the design, with a number of silver birch trees used for height and winter structure. A mix of herbaceous perennials that flower throughout the year ensure there is a plentiful supply of nectar almost all year round.

Kitchen Garden

Although not a large garden, we managed to squeeze in a small kitchen garden. Two timber raised beds provide space for growing fruit and vegetables. Black metal obelisks decorate the beds and allow climbing space for sweet peas.

Large planting borders finish the design, with silver birch used for height and winter structure. A mix of herbaceous of perennials that flower throughout the year ensure there is a plentiful supply of nectar almost all year round.

How to Choose Your Garden Designer

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Work With Us

Step 1

We will design your garden from the initial concept ideas through to finalising the requisite plans, drawings and written schedules, all of which are sent out to our recommended landscape team to quote.

Step 2

We continue to work with the landscape team throughout the build process to ensure your finished garden is installed to the highest standards and as per the specification.

Step 3

After sourcing the best quality plants at the best price, we will be on site to carefully set out all the plants in their final positions, ready for the landscape team to plant them.

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